Frost & Sullivan recently hosted the Digital Media – India Summit 2011, which addressed the challenges of emerging technologies such as digital television, digital asset management, over-the-top (OTT) content distribution on the web and mobile media, cloud implementation in media-related services, and digital cinema. India is at the cusp of a revolution in digital and high-definition (HD) adoption, with content companies and publishers seriously evaluating new media delivery alternatives as well as planning significant capital expenditures to upgrade their infrastructure over the next 3-5 years.

In the inaugural address at the Summit, Shri Arvind Kumar, former Joint Secretary (Broadcasting), Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, said, “Fortunately, now, there is a general consensus amongst all the stakeholders, from broadcasters to cable operators, that digitization is the need of the hour and that it should be implemented in a time-bound manner. The Ministry in consultation with TRAI has now finalized a way forward which includes amendments to the Cable Act, timelines for a four phased transition, increase in FDI limits and other incentives required to be given to the industry.”

Today, just about 5 percent of the broadcast channels is transmitted in HD and a little over 30 percent of the television households have access to digital television services in India. Frost & Sullivan notes that India will be an emerging and potentially high-growth market for digital media companies in the next 5 years, though not without its share of challenges.

The challenges faced by this market include a slow regulatory process to define digitization deadlines for cable multiple system operators (MSOs) and broadcasters, inadequate drive among stakeholders to increase investments in digitization, rapidly changing technologies in recent times that slow CAPEX decisions, and legacy of content on tape across various verticals.

Frost & Sullivan recently hosted the Digital Media – India Summit 2011, which addressed the challenges of emerging technologies such as digital television, digital asset management, over-the-top (OTT) content distribution on the web and mobile media, cloud implementation in media-related services, and digital cinema. India is at the cusp of a revolution in digital and high-definition (HD) adoption, with content companies and publishers seriously evaluating new media delivery alternatives as well as planning significant capital expenditures to upgrade their infrastructure over the next 3-5 years.

In the inaugural address at the Summit, Shri Arvind Kumar, former Joint Secretary (Broadcasting), Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, said, “Fortunately, now, there is a general consensus amongst all the stakeholders, from broadcasters to cable operators, that digitization is the need of the hour and that it should be implemented in a time-bound manner. The Ministry in consultation with TRAI has now finalized a way forward which includes amendments to the Cable Act, timelines for a four phased transition, increase in FDI limits and other incentives required to be given to the industry.”

Today, just about 5 percent of the broadcast channels is transmitted in HD and a little over 30 percent of the television households have access to digital television services in India. Frost & Sullivan notes that India will be an emerging and potentially high-growth market for digital media companies in the next 5 years, though not without its share of challenges.

The challenges faced by this market include a slow regulatory process to define digitization deadlines for cable multiple system operators (MSOs) and broadcasters, inadequate drive among stakeholders to increase investments in digitization, rapidly changing technologies in recent times that slow CAPEX decisions, and legacy of content on tape across various verticals.

Frost & Sullivan recently hosted the Digital Media – India Summit 2011, which addressed the challenges of emerging technologies such as digital television, digital asset management, over-the-top (OTT) content distribution on the web and mobile media, cloud implementation in media-related services, and digital cinema. India is at the cusp of a revolution in digital and high-definition (HD) adoption, with content companies and publishers seriously evaluating new media delivery alternatives as well as planning significant capital expenditures to upgrade their infrastructure over the next 3-5 years.

In the inaugural address at the Summit, Shri Arvind Kumar, former Joint Secretary (Broadcasting), Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, said, “Fortunately, now, there is a general consensus amongst all the stakeholders, from broadcasters to cable operators, that digitization is the need of the hour and that it should be implemented in a time-bound manner. The Ministry in consultation with TRAI has now finalized a way forward which includes amendments to the Cable Act, timelines for a four phased transition, increase in FDI limits and other incentives required to be given to the industry.”

Today, just about 5 percent of the broadcast channels is transmitted in HD and a little over 30 percent of the television households have access to digital television services in India. Frost & Sullivan notes that India will be an emerging and potentially high-growth market for digital media companies in the next 5 years, though not without its share of challenges.

The challenges faced by this market include a slow regulatory process to define digitization deadlines for cable multiple system operators (MSOs) and broadcasters, inadequate drive among stakeholders to increase investments in digitization, rapidly changing technologies in recent times that slow CAPEX decisions, and legacy of content on tape across various verticals.

Frost & Sullivan recently hosted the Digital Media – India Summit 2011, which addressed the challenges of emerging technologies such as digital television, digital asset management, over-the-top (OTT) content distribution on the web and mobile media, cloud implementation in media-related services, and digital cinema. India is at the cusp of a revolution in digital and high-definition (HD) adoption, with content companies and publishers seriously evaluating new media delivery alternatives as well as planning significant capital expenditures to upgrade their infrastructure over the next 3-5 years.

In the inaugural address at the Summit, Shri Arvind Kumar, former Joint Secretary (Broadcasting), Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, said, “Fortunately, now, there is a general consensus amongst all the stakeholders, from broadcasters to cable operators, that digitization is the need of the hour and that it should be implemented in a time-bound manner. The Ministry in consultation with TRAI has now finalized a way forward which includes amendments to the Cable Act, timelines for a four phased transition, increase in FDI limits and other incentives required to be given to the industry.”

Today, just about 5 percent of the broadcast channels is transmitted in HD and a little over 30 percent of the television households have access to digital television services in India. Frost & Sullivan notes that India will be an emerging and potentially high-growth market for digital media companies in the next 5 years, though not without its share of challenges.

The challenges faced by this market include a slow regulatory process to define digitization deadlines for cable multiple system operators (MSOs) and broadcasters, inadequate drive among stakeholders to increase investments in digitization, rapidly changing technologies in recent times that slow CAPEX decisions, and legacy of content on tape across various verticals.

Frost & Sullivan recently hosted the Digital Media – India Summit 2011, which addressed the challenges of emerging technologies such as digital television, digital asset management, over-the-top (OTT) content distribution on the web and mobile media, cloud implementation in media-related services, and digital cinema. India is at the cusp of a revolution in digital and high-definition (HD) adoption, with content companies and publishers seriously evaluating new media delivery alternatives as well as planning significant capital expenditures to upgrade their infrastructure over the next 3-5 years.

In the inaugural address at the Summit, Shri Arvind Kumar, former Joint Secretary (Broadcasting), Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, said, “Fortunately, now, there is a general consensus amongst all the stakeholders, from broadcasters to cable operators, that digitization is the need of the hour and that it should be implemented in a time-bound manner. The Ministry in consultation with TRAI has now finalized a way forward which includes amendments to the Cable Act, timelines for a four phased transition, increase in FDI limits and other incentives required to be given to the industry.”

Today, just about 5 percent of the broadcast channels is transmitted in HD and a little over 30 percent of the television households have access to digital television services in India. Frost & Sullivan notes that India will be an emerging and potentially high-growth market for digital media companies in the next 5 years, though not without its share of challenges.

The challenges faced by this market include a slow regulatory process to define digitization deadlines for cable multiple system operators (MSOs) and broadcasters, inadequate drive among stakeholders to increase investments in digitization, rapidly changing technologies in recent times that slow CAPEX decisions, and legacy of content on tape across various verticals.

Frost & Sullivan recently hosted the Digital Media – India Summit 2011, which addressed the challenges of emerging technologies such as digital television, digital asset management, over-the-top (OTT) content distribution on the web and mobile media, cloud implementation in media-related services, and digital cinema. India is at the cusp of a revolution in digital and high-definition (HD) adoption, with content companies and publishers seriously evaluating new media delivery alternatives as well as planning significant capital expenditures to upgrade their infrastructure over the next 3-5 years.

In the inaugural address at the Summit, Shri Arvind Kumar, former Joint Secretary (Broadcasting), Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, said, “Fortunately, now, there is a general consensus amongst all the stakeholders, from broadcasters to cable operators, that digitization is the need of the hour and that it should be implemented in a time-bound manner. The Ministry in consultation with TRAI has now finalized a way forward which includes amendments to the Cable Act, timelines for a four phased transition, increase in FDI limits and other incentives required to be given to the industry.”

Today, just about 5 percent of the broadcast channels is transmitted in HD and a little over 30 percent of the television households have access to digital television services in India. Frost & Sullivan notes that India will be an emerging and potentially high-growth market for digital media companies in the next 5 years, though not without its share of challenges.

The challenges faced by this market include a slow regulatory process to define digitization deadlines for cable multiple system operators (MSOs) and broadcasters, inadequate drive among stakeholders to increase investments in digitization, rapidly changing technologies in recent times that slow CAPEX decisions, and legacy of content on tape across various verticals.

Frost & Sullivan recently hosted the Digital Media – India Summit 2011, which addressed the challenges of emerging technologies such as digital television, digital asset management, over-the-top (OTT) content distribution on the web and mobile media, cloud implementation in media-related services, and digital cinema. India is at the cusp of a revolution in digital and high-definition (HD) adoption, with content companies and publishers seriously evaluating new media delivery alternatives as well as planning significant capital expenditures to upgrade their infrastructure over the next 3-5 years.

In the inaugural address at the Summit, Shri Arvind Kumar, former Joint Secretary (Broadcasting), Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, said, “Fortunately, now, there is a general consensus amongst all the stakeholders, from broadcasters to cable operators, that digitization is the need of the hour and that it should be implemented in a time-bound manner. The Ministry in consultation with TRAI has now finalized a way forward which includes amendments to the Cable Act, timelines for a four phased transition, increase in FDI limits and other incentives required to be given to the industry.”

Today, just about 5 percent of the broadcast channels is transmitted in HD and a little over 30 percent of the television households have access to digital television services in India. Frost & Sullivan notes that India will be an emerging and potentially high-growth market for digital media companies in the next 5 years, though not without its share of challenges.

The challenges faced by this market include a slow regulatory process to define digitization deadlines for cable multiple system operators (MSOs) and broadcasters, inadequate drive among stakeholders to increase investments in digitization, rapidly changing technologies in recent times that slow CAPEX decisions, and legacy of content on tape across various verticals.

Frost & Sullivan recently hosted the Digital Media – India Summit 2011, which addressed the challenges of emerging technologies such as digital television, digital asset management, over-the-top (OTT) content distribution on the web and mobile media, cloud implementation in media-related services, and digital cinema. India is at the cusp of a revolution in digital and high-definition (HD) adoption, with content companies and publishers seriously evaluating new media delivery alternatives as well as planning significant capital expenditures to upgrade their infrastructure over the next 3-5 years.

In the inaugural address at the Summit, Shri Arvind Kumar, former Joint Secretary (Broadcasting), Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, said, “Fortunately, now, there is a general consensus amongst all the stakeholders, from broadcasters to cable operators, that digitization is the need of the hour and that it should be implemented in a time-bound manner. The Ministry in consultation with TRAI has now finalized a way forward which includes amendments to the Cable Act, timelines for a four phased transition, increase in FDI limits and other incentives required to be given to the industry.”

Today, just about 5 percent of the broadcast channels is transmitted in HD and a little over 30 percent of the television households have access to digital television services in India. Frost & Sullivan notes that India will be an emerging and potentially high-growth market for digital media companies in the next 5 years, though not without its share of challenges.

The challenges faced by this market include a slow regulatory process to define digitization deadlines for cable multiple system operators (MSOs) and broadcasters, inadequate drive among stakeholders to increase investments in digitization, rapidly changing technologies in recent times that slow CAPEX decisions, and legacy of content on tape across various verticals.